yaelstiel:

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Sometimes, one good word can change the world 

↳ Dean Winchester Guide to Encouragement. 

For Larissa  (◕‿◕✿)

I wonder sometimes what percentage of Dean Winchester’s childhood his little brother has an even halfway informed image of.

populardad:

there is a difference between people who are smart and people who get good grades

agreed, so long as its understood one can be a subset of the other. :)

deanwinchesterprays:

If I loved Dean Winchester any more than I already do, I would be Castiel.

i-think-i-m-adorable:

AU: Cas in search of Demon!Dean

fireintheimpala:

mishcollin:

image

we have entered the ultimate state of denial folks

#did we…..nOT just see dean trying to take sam’s head off with an axe…??#did i hallucinate that…??//???//

no, no, he was just trying to give Sammy a haircut.

Okay…honest question considering Dean literally talked to him condescendingly while stalking him instead of moving silently and getting right up behind Sam…

Does ANYONE really think if Dean wanted Sam dead he wouldn’t be?

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

if you’re not sexually attracted to demon!dean bold what applies to you

clarasdestiny:

  • I’m a fucking liar
  • I’m a fucking liar
  • I’m a fucking liar
  • I’m a fucking liar
  • I’m a fucking liar
  • I’m a fucking liar
  • I’m a fucking liar
  • I AM LYING THROUGH MY TEETH
  • SO MANY LIES
  • LIESSSSS~~~~~~

Can I claim an attraction I’m not sure is sexual so much as a bizarre combination of emotional/cognitive.

I’m drawn to him because of the difference from his previous incarnation, both good and bad, and the changes in the long term his presence could catalyze.

36,072 plays

mooseleys:

this is the apocalypse, so…buckle up